Science Says: Why biodiversity matters to you

Hungarian President Janos Ader, right, wearing a beekeeper hat gets to know the biomonitoring system for bee life at the University of Sopron, where he delivered a lecture on climate change in Sopron, 210 kms west of Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. (Szilard Koszticsak/MTI via AP)

You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, but scientists say the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous ways

Scientists say you may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in unseen ways.

A massive United Nations report Monday said that nature is in trouble and that 1 million species are threatened with extinction if nothing is done about it.

The report says nature is essential for human existence.

It spells out 18 ways nature helps keep people alive. Those include food, energy, medicine, water, protection from storms and floods, and slowing climate change. The report said 14 of those are on long-term declining trends.

Duke University ecologist Stuart Pimm says if you destroy nature it bites you.

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