Cleveland drug attorney highlights need for best criminal defense due to growing drug possession and trafficking charges – Cleveland, OH

Edward La Rue, has recently discussed the growing drug problem in America, during an interview in Ohio. For more information please visit http://www.edwardrlarue.com/

Cleveland, OH, United States - February 13, 2018 /MM-REB/ —

Leading Cleveland drug attorney, Edward La Rue, has recently discussed the growing drug problem in America, during an interview in Ohio.

For more information please visit http://www.edwardrlarue.com/

Deaths resulting from drug usage in Ohio are expected to surge 70% by 2025, a report recently released by Trust for American’s Health and the Well Being Trust found. This means that in less than a decade 48.5 per 100,000 deaths in Ohio will be drug related.

When asked to comment, La Rue said, “The headlines are not misleading. Drug usage is one of America’s age-old problems that has resurfaced in years, largely stemming from the opioid epidemic.”

Other estimates put drug-related mortality rates in the state higher – at nearly double-fold – by 2025 largely due to the surge in the usage of opioids, such as heroin, fentanyl, and carfentanil.

While this is a widespread problem throughout America, Ohio has it worse than most. The Buckeye state is slated to rank 11th in America by 2025 in terms of mortality rates resulting from drug/alcohol use or suicide.

“Increased drug usage means more arrests, and more arrests mean a need for clients to seek a defense attorney who can mount a successful case, especially at a time when law enforcement will be cracking down on illicit activity.”

The extent of the drug problem faced by Ohio has not always been this severe.

Deaths from drug overdoses in the state have increased 506% since 1999 as per figures from the Trust for American’s Health report.

“The opioid crisis, which has hit Ohio in particular, has happened so rapidly, placing strain the existing legal system. This situation calls for defense attorneys who can navigate the evolving legal system both at the state and federal levels,” De Rue commented.

New laws and new regulations will be created to combat drug and alcohol usage, De Rue added. Some of these new regulations could include making sure that opioids aren’t being overprescribed by doctors or increase the availability of rescue drugs.

“However, this is not a problem that is going away anytime soon. While prevention and treatment efforts are in the works, no one knows how long it’ll take to curb the current drug crisis. In the meantime, we’ll be working within the legal system to help our clients also fight the opioid crisis,” he said.

Source: http://RecommendedExperts.biz/

Contact Info:
Name: Attorney Edward R. La Rue
Organization: Edward R. La Rue
Address: 820 W Superior Ave #840, Cleveland, OH 44113, USA
Phone: 216-696-8995

For more information, please visit http://www.edwardrlarue.com/

Source: MM-REB

Release ID: 300507

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