Amazon Launches Amazon for Teens, Enabling Parents To Preview Teens’ Orders

E-commerce juggernaut Amazon unveiled a new program targeting teens and their parents as part of the company’s Amazon Households program. Now, thanks to Amazon for Teens, teenagers will have the ability to shop Amazon’s catalog of over fifty million products and benefits of Amazon Prime.

Phoenix, United States - October 12, 2017 /PressCable/ —

On Wednesday, E-commerce juggernaut Amazon unveiled a new program targeting teens and their parents as part of the company’s Amazon Households program. Now, thanks to Amazon for Teens, teenagers will have the ability to shop Amazon’s catalog of over fifty million products, as well as the opportunity to enjoy all the benefits of Amazon Prime, provided a household member is enrolled, including two-day Prime Shipping and the streaming of thousands of movies and television shows via Prime Video.

There are two different paths to enrollment. Parents have the option of signing up their 13 to 17-year-old children, or teens can send an invitation to Mom or Dad via a text or email message. Once a parent confirms a method of payment and the shipping address for the teen’s orders, the teen can log in, using a separate user name and password, and begin adding items to a shopping cart, building a tentative order which parents can then preview.

For each item in the cart, the parent will receive a text or email message containing a description of the product, plus shipment and payment information. The parent can decide to leave the item on the order simply by replying “Y.” Amazon will notify both the parent and teen about the order’s estimated delivery date.

Each teen will have the option to attach a note to any item, possibly to explain his or her intended use (e.g., “I need this for a school project”) or merely to influence the parent’s final decision (e.g., “I really, really want this, PLEASE!”). Parents who don’t feel the need to preview orders can simply pre-approve spending limits, thereby opting to receive order summary notifications instead.

In a statement explaining the new program launch, Michael Carr, Vice President of Amazon Households, stated, “As a parent of a teen, I know how they crave independence, but at the same time that has to be balanced with the convenience and trust that parents need. We’ve listened to families and have built a great experience for both teens and parents.” Some more cynical observers believe Amazon for Teens is merely a mechanism by which consumers will become addicted to online shopping, and Amazon , at an early age.

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Source: PressCable

Release ID: 249803

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